MARTA

Marta was born in Bogotá Colombia, raised in New York and New Orleans.

She's been a photojournalist, traveling to Russia, Mexico, Peru, Colombia, and Europe. Her photos have shown in galleries and museums throughout the world, including her photo essay on a charity mental hospital in Colombia. She's also worked as a still photographer on films that starred actors such as Nicolas Cage, John Savage, and Martin Sheen.

Then writing became Marta's other obsession. On her return to New Orleans, she began a writing and directing collaboration with Tom Murphy. Their videos, shown at film festivals in New Orleans, New York and Los Angeles, tackled sensitive subjects. They won praise, awards and— sometimes— controversy. Marta was awarded a grant from Novac to produce her 20-minute Surreal Documentary, Disposable Income, loosely-based on Aileen Wuornos, the first female serial killer executed in the U.S.

She and Tom were chosen as part of The Top Fifty to Watch by New Orleans Magazine, and were featured on the cover.

After moving to Los Angeles, Marta was chosen for the WGA Writing Program, a paid internship with the writers at Star Trek Voyager. She was thrown in the midst of highly creative people constantly brainstorming— it was the most fun she's ever had at a day job.

In 2001, her screenplay, Daniel, (about the Vatican/Nazi collaboration in post-World War II) was a semi-finalist in the Chesterfield Writers Project and in the Academy of Arts and Sciences' prestigious Nicholl Fellowship.

An early draft of her horror novel, Bloodline,(the coming-of-age story of a girl and her dysfunctional werewolf family) was a quarter-finalist in the Chesterfield Writers Project.

In 2002, she was awarded a Paul Verhoeven Scholarship and a Women in Film / Universal Studios Mentor Scholarship for the Feature Film Development Program of the Los Angeles Film School.

Spooky Films recently published two of Marta's photography books.The House on Rue Burgundy and Carnival Dreams: Unmasking the Spirit

Marta lives in Los Angeles, and loves it. She's presently working on The Dream Machine, a supernatural screenplay about time travel and soul transference in Hollywood— which is only partly autobiographical.